March 21, 2012

We're in the Valley Now!

Right after the Jolley family moved to Utah the boys in the family were called to serve the church and their community.
In 1852 the Washington L, her second eldest, was called to go on a mission to Texas to preach the Gospel. Soon after this Berry Jolley also went to Texas on a mission.
Before 1859 the family moved from Palmyra, Spanish Fork, and Payson. One day while Henry Jolley was herding the cattle in the field the Sheriff stopped by and took Him to Chief Black Hawk’s camp where they found his squaw had died and they arranged a burial for her.
“In 1865 the Jolleys moved to Moroni, Sanpete County, Utah. The Black Hawk Indian War started later that year and Henry was in a company that was ordered to investigate the massacre in Thistle Valley. Moroni became a Fort for all colonists in the county. Henry served as a guard until 1866 when he was called back the Missouri river and lead a wagon train back to Utah. Along the way back the wagon train was wary of Indian attacks, timber wolves and had to work to make money to buy supplies. Upon returning to Utah the Indian conflicts had increased. Henry returned to the fighting until 1867 when he became a rancher and a mill owner.”

March 12, 2012

Life in the Valley

The following is an account of the family’s first few months in Utah thay had made it across the valley.
“We did not have much to live on; times were very hard as the grasshoppers and crickets had eaten everything up. Grandfather Jolley came on before we did and when he heard that we were coming he met us on Emigration Street. He took us to his home where we stopped for a few days. He said he was going to move to Utah County now Pleasant Grove, so we moved there about the 15th of October. My boys built a little house to help make a fort. On the 20th of December, grandfather died and was buried at the same place, the first white person buried there.”
“I then felt as though I was lost again but had to do the best I could.”
Within the next few years Sarah’s boys would take a great part in the colonizing and establishment of Utah.

March 5, 2012

Heigh-Ho to the Valley They Go

This week I will continue the story of the family’s journey west. I feel the best way to do this is to once again use the words of my ancestor.
“The 2nd day of July, 1849, I and my family started for council Bluffs, where we wintered. The next spring, June 6th, we started for Salt Lake. I had a hard time with my little family, but the hand of the lord was over me and my children. The cholera was very bad that year and two of my children came near unto death, but they were spared by the hand of the Lord. We arrived in the valley on the 27th of September, 1850, in the Ezra T. Benson Company.”
Even though the family made it across the plains without any more casualties they would find even more difficulties upon arriving in the valley. Once they arrived, the family found that they would only have more hardship in the Utah Desert.
Next week I will delve into this families experience as pioneers in Utah.

February 27, 2012

Arriving in the Valley

For the next part of the story listen to my Podcast. This podcast is from a letter/ autobiography that Sarah Pippin wrote to her children in her later years. The part I read describes the family moving to Nauvoo, working on the temple and Reuben Manning passing away and his request to his family. 

Join me next week to see what the family did when they entered the valley.

February 21, 2012

Moving Up and Out

This week I will continue the story of the family’s journey west. I feel the best way to do this is to once agin use the words of my ancestor.
“The 2nd day of july, 1849, I and my family started for council Bluffs, where we wintered. The next spring, june 6th, we started for Salt Lake. I had a hard time with my little family, but the hand of the lord was over me and my children. The cholera was very bad that year and two of my children came near unto death, but they were spared by the hand of the Lord. We arrived in the valley on the 27th of September, 1850, in the Ezra T. Benson Company.”
Even though the family made it across the plains without any more casualties they would find even more difficulties upon arriving in the valley. Once they arrived, the family found the that they would only have more hardship in the Utah Desert. 

Join me next week for news about the family in the valley.

February 14, 2012

Moving West

As I have stated before the family joined the church in 1842 and moved to Nauvoo. In Nauvoo the last three children were born and their family was complete. After living in Nauvoo and across the river for 4 years the saints were preparing to move west. In the preparation to leave Nauvoo the Jolleys had little means and a large family. Unfortunately when they were almost ready to leave Ruben became ill and after twenty days he died in Van Buren County, Iowa.

The following is a quote from her autobiography obtained from the DUP Records
“After twenty days he died on the 29th of April 1849. I was left alone with ten children with no house and no home among strangers. I had a babe in my arms just three months old. I was all broken up. When on his deathbed my husband would talk to me and tell me what he wanted me to do. He said he was going to leave me for a little while but he wanted me, as soon as I could, to go to the calleys of the mountains, to the bosom of the church and to take all of the children with me so I bore it in mind and started to do so.”

February 1, 2012

The following is what happened before Reuben Manning Jolley and Sarah Pippen joined the church or moved to Nauvoo, Illinois. Not much is known about the early lives of any of the ten children before my ancestor’s migrated.  The following are early histories of the first seven children that were born near Dresden, Tennessee. Right now what I can offer my readers is the names birthdates, places and accounts of those that have passed in the early years before they joined the church and moved to Illinois.

·   William Jackson Jolley
o 8 Nov 1829
o Dresden, Weakley, Tennessee 
·   Washington Lafayette Jolley
o 14 May 1831
o Dresden, Weakley, Tennessee 
·   Caroline Carson Jolley
o 15 Nov 1832
o Dresden, Weakley, Tennessee 
·   Pelique Berry Jolley
o 16 Mar 1834
o Dresden, Weakley, Tennessee 
·   Mary Ann Jolley
o 13 Oct 1836
o Dresden, Weakley, Tennessee
o 8 Feb 1839
o Dresden, Weakley, Tennessee

Mary did not live in this world long. When she was around three years old she put her mouth over the spout of a boiling tea kettle. She died from the burns caused by this unfortunate event and was buried in Dresden, Tennessee on 10 Feb. 1839.
·   Sarah Ann Jolley
o 18 Dec 1837
o Dresden, Weakley, Tennessee
·   Francis Marion Jolley
o 9 Apr 1841
o Dresden, Weakley, Tennessee